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Why A Healthy Lifestyle Will Make You A Better Real Estate Agent

Posted by Dave Crumby on Aug 16, 2016 1:00:00 PM
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woman runningHere at Revolve, we take health very seriously. And we want you to take it seriously, too. Why?

Because you have one body—one vehicle to get through life—and you need to take care of your human capital so you’re not exhausted, sleep deprived, and burned out. It’s not going to do you any good to work on building a business for a few years...and then get sick without being able to enjoy it.

This is not about vanity; it’s about sustainability.

Consider these statistics:

  • A recent study found that people who exercise earn on average 9% more than those who don’t.
  • On the flip side, in a 2007 study, those who were technically obese earned on average 18% less than those who weren’t.

A growing body of evidence suggests we think and learn better when we walk or do another form of exercise, as exercise enhances cognition due to improved blood flow to the brain.

I’m not saying you need to become an elite athlete. But I do suggest that you establish healthy habits. You’ll be amazed at the impact they have on your real estate business and your life.

 

10 Guidelines For A Healthier Life

To help guide you in improving your health (and thus, improving your real estate business), I’d like to share 10 simple guidelines that I learned from Mark Sisson, creator of the Primal Blueprint.

Disclaimer: Please don’t be stupid and overdo any of this. It would make me quite unhappy. Consult a doctor before doing anything recommended below.

 

Eat lots of animals and plants

I don’t want to offend or condescend to vegetarians or vegans. I respect choice. However, humans are omnivores, after all. 

That said, not all meat is created equal. Focus on quality sources of protein (all forms of meat, fowl, fish ideally from sources that allow animals to graze in natural environments—for example, grass-fed beef vs feed lots), lots of colorful vegetables, some select fruits (mostly berries), and healthy fats (nuts, avocados, olive oil).

Observe portion control (80% of fullness) unless you are performing rigorous exercise with massive calorie output.

Eliminate grains, sugars, trans- and hydrogenated fats from your diet.

 

Move around a lot at a slow pace

As real estate agents, we tend to sit at our desks a lot. This is not healthy and researchers agree that it has similar long term health consequences as smoking. So commit to doing some form of low level aerobic activity 2-5 hours a week, whether it is walking, hiking, easy bike riding or swimming.

 

Lift heavy things

We’re not suggesting you need to become an Olympic lifter, but if you’re able, go to the gym and lift weights two to three times a week. Ditch the machines and focus on movements that involve the entire body and in wider ranges of motion. Emulate the movements of our ancestors: jumping, squatting, lunging, pushing, pulling, twisting, etc.

This will stimulate your genes to increase muscle strength and power, increase bone density, improve insulin sensitivity, stimulate growth hormone secretion, and consume stored body fat—not to mention, it’s an incredible natural reliever of stress.

 

Run really quickly every once in a while

When is the last time you ran as fast as you could (without being chased)? Do some form of intense anaerobic sprint bursts a couple times a week. This could be as simple as six or eight (or more) short sprints up a hill, on the grass, at the beach… or repeated intense sessions on a bicycle (stationary, road or mountain bike).

These short bursts also increase human growth hormone (HGH) release, which is actually released in proportion to the intensity (not the duration) of the exercise.

 

Get lots of sleep

Get plenty of quality sleep. Our lives are so hectic and full of things to do after the sun goes down that it’s often difficult to get an adequate amount of sleep. Yet sleep is one of the most important factors in maintaining good health, vibrant energy, and a strong immune system.

 

Play

Spend some time each week involved in active play. In addition to allowing you to apply your fitness to a real-life situation, play helps dissipate some of the negative effects of the chronic stress hormones you’ve been accumulating through the week.

 

Get some sunlight every day

Contrary to the “Common Wisdom” dispensed by dermatologists (who suggest you shun the sun), you should get some direct sunlight every day. Certainly not so much that you come close to burning, but definitely enough to prompt your body to make the all-important vitamin D and to support the mood-lifting benefits. A slight tan is a good indicator that you have maintained adequate Vitamin D levels.

Natural sunlight also has a powerful mood-elevating effect, which can enhance productivity at work and in inter-personal interactions, and fresh air always does a body good.

 

Avoid poisonous things

We all have busy days and when time is tight, it’s all too tempting to hit the drive thru at a fast food joint to get some calories in. 

Please don’t. The things we eat either add to or take away from our health. All it takes is a little planning. Try shopping on the perimeter of the grocery store. Most of what is healthful is on the outskirts (fruits, veggies, meat). Avoid fast and processed food and also try to avoid the hidden poisons in foods like sugars, grains, processed foods, trans and hydrogenated fats, and mercury in certain fish.

 

Use your mind

Exercise your brain daily as our ancestors did. Be inventive, creative, and aware. If your work is not stimulating (or even if it is), find time to read, write, play an instrument, and interact socially.

 

Health Matters

Health and wellness have a direct effect not only on your quality of life, but also on the quality of your business. Exercising your mind and body should take precedent in your day. Continue to evolve your health routine to find out what works for you. I recommend exploring the works of Mark Sisson and Melissa & Dallas Hartwig.

 

Sources:

  • June issue of Journal of labor Research.
  • The Economics of Obesity. GENDER, BODY MASS, AND SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS: NEWEVIDENCE FROM THE PSID.
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